Institute of Sociology
of the Federal Center of Theoretical and Applied Sociology
of the Russian Academy of Sciences

S.G. Klimova. Innovative behavior of employees working russians: everyday practices and institutional conditions. Social and labor research. 2020;38(1): 85-97. DOI: 10.34022 ...



S.G. Klimova. Innovative behavior of employees working russians: everyday practices and institutional conditions. Social and labor research. 2020;38(1): 85-97. DOI: 10.34022/2658-3712-2020-38-1-85-97.
ISSN 2658-3712
DOI 10.34022/2658-3712-2020-38-1-85-97.

Posted on site: 23.03.20

Search full text on Google Academia

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to present the results of a study of the changes that have occurred in the innovative behaviour of working Russians in the past ten years. The main objective of the study is to find out which circumstances stimulate the innovative activity of employees and which inhibit it. The empirical base of the survey consists of the results of two representative surveys conducted by the Public Opinion Foundation in 2009 and 2018. The research methods are factor and comparative analysis of the data of the two surveys by socio-demographic and typological groups of respondents. The study has registered changes in labour behaviour strategies which have taken place in the past ten years. It shows no increase in the number of Russian employees demonstrating signs of innovative behaviour (those who participate in industry and vocational conferences and exhibitions; receive additional education; upgrade their skills; buy professional books, newspapers and journals; put forward work improvement proposals, and initiate innovations at their workplace). It has been established that the main circumstances inhibiting workers’ innovative behaviour are the organizational and regulatory conditions of work, among which the author identifies neo-Fordist management practices; employers taking liberties with copyright laws; general narrowing of the scope of law in labour relations. It is concluded that social actors, primarily employers, interested in the results of innovative activity strive to maximize the use of employees’ qualification resources, but they care little about their replenishment and practically do not stimulate innovative activity per se. The results of the study can be used in building relationships between the three parties in the innovation production process: government bodies, employers, and employees or agencies representing their interests.